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Macintosh SE

Macintosh SE

Launched in March 1987, the Macintosh SE was equipped with 1MB RAM, up to two double-sided 800K floppies and support for an internal SCSI hard drive. It was also the first compact Macintosh to sport a built-in fan.

Apple III+

Apple III+

Retailing for US$2,695 the Apple III+ replaced the original Apple III, addressing known hardware problems and increased on-board RAM to 256kb. It also contained a built-in clock, video interlacing and a re-styled keyboard.

ImageWriter II

ImageWriter II

Launched in 1985, the ImageWriter II was a dot matrix printer with a maximum resolution of 144 DPI. It featured an iconic design and was popular with small businesses due to the low cost ribbons and support for track paper. It supported three levels of print quality: draft, standard, and near letter quality. It retailed for US$600.

Bandai Pippin

Bandai Pippin

Designed by Apple but distributed by Atmark, the Bandai Pippin was a gaming console running a watered down version of Mac System 7.5. It was powered by a PowerPC 603 CPU. It retailed for US$599 and was only released in the US and Japanese markets.

PowerBook Duo 250

PowerBook Duo 250

The Macintosh PowerBook Duo 250 offered high performance in a 4-pound package. It included a CPU, full-size 16-gray-level supertwist display, keyboard and trackball, battery, and disk storage and could be transformed into a desktop Macintosh by attaching it to an optional Duo Dock or MiniDock.

Apple Mouse IIe

Apple Mouse IIe

The Apple Mouse IIe was the last mouse made for the Apple IIe. It used a DE9 connector, and was compatible with the Apple II, II+, Macintosh 128k, 512k and Macintosh Plus.

Macintosh Display Card 8.24

Macintosh Display Card 8.24

Retailing at US$899 in 1990, the Macintosh Display Card 8.24 greatly increased (up to 30 times faster) the responsiveness of all Macintosh applications – especially graphics-intensive ones, with easier access to high-resolution color, 24-bit color and true gray scale to all modular Macintosh users in thousands of applications.

Unifile Twiggy Drive

Unifile Twiggy Drive

Created in 1983, the Unifile Twiggy floppy drive was a double-sided drive that had heads on opposite sides of the spindle instead of opposing each other as conventional drives did. It also used unconventional floppy media, named “FileWare”, with two cutouts instead of one. Fileware Twiggy Disks offered the unheard of capacity of over 800k and the Unifile was announced by Apple but was never shipped before the program was canceled.

MultiServer

MultiServer

The Apple MultiServer was planned as an OEM version of 3Com’s 3Server dedicated file server from 1986. It had an Intel 80188 processor, 1MB RAM, 80MB HD (expandable via SCSI to 768MB), and connected to thin Ethernet coax, telephone modems, and Apple’s LocalTalk. It ran 3Com’s 3+ software for File and Print sharing, EMail and internetwork Routing. It was intended to fulfill Apple’s promise of a file server for the ‘Macintosh Office’. It was cancelled at the last minute, and the unshipped units were used in Apple’s sales offices.

Macintosh IIfx

Macintosh IIfx

The Macintosh IIfx was famous for being the fastest Macintosh at the time. Launched in 1990 at a retail cost of up to $12,000 the Macintosh IIfx was powered with a 40 MHz 68030 CPU and expandable to 128 MB RAM.

Mac OS X Jaguar 10.2

Mac OS X Jaguar 10.2

Mac OS X Jaguar 10.2 was the third major release of Mac OS X. Release in August 2002, it was an incremental improvement on 10.1 in the areas of stability, general speed enhancements and compatibility.

Thunderbolt 2011

Thunderbolt 2011

Retailing at US$999, the 2011 Thunderbolt Display was the first Apple display to incorporate Thunderbolt I/O technology to move data between devices and computers speeds of up to 20 times faster than USB 2.0 and up to 12 times faster than FireWire 800. The display itself was a huge 27-inch glossy widescreen display featuring a cinematic 16:9 aspect ratio and an astonishing 2560-by-1440 resolution.

Macintosh PowerBook Duo 210

Macintosh PowerBook Duo 210

The Macintosh PowerBook Duo 210 offered high performance in a 4-pound package. It included a CPU, full-size 16-gray-level supertwist display, keyboard and trackball, battery, and disk storage and could be transformed into a desktop Macintosh by attaching it to an optional Duo Dock or MiniDock.

Apple Mouse

Apple Mouse

The Apple Mouse was a hand held cursor-control device for the Macintosh line of computers.

Macintosh PowerBook 1400cs

Macintosh PowerBook 1400cs

The PowerBook 1400cs, part of the PowerBook 1400 family, was the first CD-ROM equipped notebook. The 1400cs sported a dual-scan passive matrix technology but lacked built-in ethernet and a modem.

Apple IIgs

Apple IIgs

The Apple IIGS was the most powerful of the Apple II line of machines. The GS (which stood for Graphics and Sounds) was a radical advance from previous models with advanced color graphics, sound and music synthesis, 16-bit architecture and a mouse.

Power Macintosh 6100

Power Macintosh 6100

The 6100/60 was the entry-level Power Macintosh model introduced by Apple in 1994. Built into a Quadra 610 case, the 6100 contained a PDS (Processor Direct Slot) which could be converted to a NuBus slot with an adapter.

PowerBook 165

Macintosh PowerBook 165

The Macintosh PowerBook 165 was a black and white version of the PowerBook 165c. It was launched in 1993 and retailed for just under US$2,000. It sported a 33 Mhz 68030 processor, 4Mb RAM (expandable to 14Mb), 9.8″ 4-bit 640 x 400 passive matrix screen, SCSI HDI30 connector, 80 or 160 MB hard drive, and weighed 6.8 lbs.

Power Macintosh 6100

Power Macintosh 6100

The 6100/60 was the entry-level Power Macintosh model introduced by Apple in 1994. Built into a Quadra 610 case, the 6100 contained a PDS (Processor Direct Slot) which could be converted to a NuBus slot with an adapter.

Apple IIc Plus

Apple IIc Plus

The Apple IIc Plus was the last model in the Apple II line. It was the successor to the Apple IIc and sported an internal 3.5″ floppy drive as well as faster processor – a 65C02 chip running at up to 4 MHz. One of it’s major features was its internal power supply, replacing the previous bulky external supply for the IIc.

Color LaserWriter Photoconductor Replacement Kit

Color LaserWriter Photoconductor Replacement Kit

The Color LaserWriter Photoconductor Replacement Kit was an accessory for the Color LaserWriter.

Apple II Paddles

Apple II Paddles

The Apple II Paddles were the first gaming controllers for the Apple II platform. Very little to no documentation seems to exist anymore for these devices.

Apple Studio Display (1999)

Apple Studio Display (1999)

The Apple Studio Display was a 15-inch flat panel LCD display. It was the first translucent product since the eMate and sported a DA-15 connector, 2 ADB ports, S-Video, Composite video, RCA audio connectors and a headphone jack.

Macintosh Quadra 610

Macintosh Quadra 610

The Macintosh Quadra 610 contained two different CPUs (Motorola and Intel) that worked independently, allowing you to run Macintosh and DOS (or Windows) applications simultaneously – and copy and paste data between the two environments. MS-DOS version 6.2 is installed on the hard drive, along with the Macintosh operating system (system software version 7.1).

Final Cut Pro 7.0 HD

Final Cut Pro 7.0 HD

Final Cut Pro was a high-performance digital nonlinear editing suite that was the first choice of professional editors worldwide. It included native support for virtually any video format, and professional-level extensibility and interoperability. It allowed you to edit everything from uncompressed standard definition video to HDV, DVCPRO HD, and uncompressed high definition video—as well as Panasonic P2 and Sony XDCAM HD tapeless formats.

StyleWriter

StyleWriter

Introduced in 1991, the StyleWriter was the first of Apple’s line of inkjet serial printers, targeted mainly towards consumers. The feed mechanism was removable, and paper could be fed through manually in a virtually straight line (via Wikipedia).

Apple II Plus

Apple II Plus

The Apple II Plus was the second model in the original Apple II line of personal computers. Launched in 1979, the Apple II Plus sported 48 KB RAM (expandable to 64KB) and included Applesoft BASIC baked into the ROM (written by Microsoft).

800K External Drive

800K External Drive

From Wikipedia: In January, 1986, Apple introduced the Macintosh Plus and a double-sided 800K capacity disk drive, which used the new HFS disk format providing directories and sub-directories. A revised external drive case was produced to accommodate the slimmer 800K disk mechanism. The Macintosh 800K External Drive (M0131) could only be used with Macintosh models except the original 128K, which could not load the new HFS file format required for use with the drive.

Newton MessagePad 130

Newton MessagePad 130

Released in 1996, the MessagePad 130 featured a 20 MHz ARM 610 processor, 8 MB ROM, 2.5 MB RAM and IR capabilities in a sleek handheld case with a 320×240 pressure-sensitive, backlit monochrome display. The MessagePad 130 was similar to the MessagePad 120 with a backlit screen, more RAM, and ran Newton OS 2.0.

Macintosh Color Display

Macintosh Color Display

The Macintosh Color Display was a 14 inch (13 inch viewable) Trinitron aperture grille CRT that was manufactured by Apple Inc. from October 19, 1992 until approximately August 1, 1993. The video cable used a standard Macintosh DA-15 video connector and the fixed resolution was 640×480 (via Wikipedia).

Mac OS 8

Mac OS 8

Mac OS 8 was released on July 26, 1997 and represented the largest overhaul of the Mac OS since the release of System 7. It was extremely successful selling over 1 million copies in the first 2 weeks. It had cross platform support for Windows 95, Windows 3.1 and DOS files, with significantly improved native support for Internet access as well as shipping with a default browser.

IIc Flat Panel Display

IIc Flat Panel Display

The Apple IIc Flat Panel Display was a black and white LCD screen designed specifically for the Apple IIc. It did not support a backlight which made it difficult to view without optimal lighting conditions. The resolution was 560×192 and used a DB-15 connector. It retailed for US$600.

Macintosh PowerBook Duo 210

Macintosh PowerBook Duo 210

The Macintosh PowerBook Duo 210 offered high performance in a 4-pound package. It included a CPU, full-size 16-gray-level supertwist display, keyboard and trackball, battery, and disk storage and could be transformed into a desktop Macintosh by attaching it to an optional Duo Dock or MiniDock.

Macintosh Plus

Macintosh Plus

The Macintosh Plus computer was the 3rd model in the Macintosh line. Launched in 1986 with a retail price of US$2,600, the ‘Mac Plus’ shipped with 1MB RAM, an external SCSI peripheral bus and could run System 7.

Apple Mouse II

Apple Mouse II

The AppleMouse II was a hand held cursor-control device for the Apple II computer. Smaller and lighter than a deck of playing cards, the sophisticated AppleMouse II let you move the cursor on the screen with intuitive ease.

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